<![CDATA[How to get a job in 90 days - Get A Job Blog]]>Wed, 01 Nov 2017 09:32:36 -0500Weebly<![CDATA[10 things to Do When You Spot the Perfect Job Opening]]>Sun, 08 Nov 2015 18:17:39 GMThttp://getajobin90days.com/get-a-job-blog/10-things-to-do-when-you-spot-the-perfect-job-openingPicture
You thought all you had to do was apply online, attach your resume, and hit send, right?  How is that working for you? 

If this is the perfect job for you, you can increase your chances to make it yours by about, oh, 500%!


I'm going to recommend that you complete a number of tasks, some of which may not be seem directly related, but it's the sum of the parts that brings "the magic".

Note: If this is not an online job posting the list is still applicable and will have an even greater impact!


Avoid skipping any one action because you never, ever, know which action will be the one that "cinches the deal".  It's rarely the one you think it will be. If it were, you would already have your brand new job.


1.  Customize your generic cover letter for this job posting.  Hint:  match skills you
       tout to the job posting.


2.  Find someone who knows someone in the company and ask for an introduction
       and c
onnect on LinkedIn with the hiring manager, recruiter, and current employee.

       A good place to start is with your Board of Advisors.


3.  Ask the current employee to "check you out" and "hand deliver" your resume, i.e.
       email it to HR on your behalf along with your customized cover letter. 

       Note:  Many companies have a policy of putting any viable application submitted
                   by a current employee at the "top of the stack".
  Most will do a phone
                   interview at the minimum.

      
(You did create an online presence worth checking out, right? 
       If not, click the button below)


4.   If you cannot find a current employee, research and contact the recruiter directly.

5.   Follow (and "like") the prospective employer on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn.

6.  Locate current employees in the role on LinkedIn, review their background, and
       note any commonalities that might help you in the application process.

       Does this employer tend to hire people with consulting firm backgrounds?
       Graduates of a certain university?  (Much more common than you might think!)
       If so, and you share these commonalities, find a way to use this in your application).


7.  AFTER your application has been submitted directly to the recruiter, complete
       the online job application as instructed in the job posting.

       The reason you submit your application via the job posting is that typically HR
       needs for you to do this to comply with company policy. 

        The reason you submit your application after the employee or recruiter submits
        your application is because, if you do so beforehand, the employee could lose an
        employee referral bonus or the recruiter could lose the commission.


The next three tasks are to ensure that, should this application not end in an offer, you are positioned to keep moving forward. 


8.   Set up search agents to learn about similar job postings from this company.

9.   Set up search agents with this job title in similar companies and with Indeed
        and other job posting sites you use.

10. Add this employer to the list of employers you are tracking on Glassdoor to learn
        about how they typically interview, salary ranges, etc.


11. And one more!  Add the job application info to your Application Summary


That's it.  Not so bad.  It took some effort and time.  BUT if your effort and time don't pay off on this application, they will on the next.

Take a break.  You deserve it.  You just showed everyone how to apply for a job.

Stop and think: your competitors aren't doing any of this. They threw a resume out into Jobland and they're sitting on the couch watching the game.  And they'll be doing the same thing a month from now while you're preparing for your final interview.

]]>
<![CDATA[15 Ways Your Target Company List Can Help You Find a Job Fast!]]>Sun, 08 Nov 2015 06:03:35 GMThttp://getajobin90days.com/get-a-job-blog/15-ways-your-target-company-list-can-help-you-find-a-job-fastPicture
You know you should make a list of prospective employers in your area.  But is it worth your time and effort?  Yes. Building your list will help you focus your efforts.  Focusing your efforts is what a good job search is all about. 

Additionally, this is a job search task where the journey is  as productive as the end result. 




How building your list can help you find a job faster
Build your list through research and by asking others for additions.


1.   You'll learn what's happening in your industry in your area.

2.   You'll build and deepen relationships in the process of doing your research when you ask
       for additions in your LinkedIn groups, on Twitter and Facebook, and in Google +, Beyond.com,
       and other communities.

3.   You'll gain credibility through the discussions you'll have as you research companies within
       your professional and industry organizations


4.   You'll have a great topic of conversation for networking events, one that slyly alerts others
       that you are in transition, while giving the other person a way to help.

5.   You'll engage your Board of Advisors. 

6.    Researching new companies to add to your list is a task
that is minimally challenging, but    
        keeps you moving forward in your job search when you are waiting to hear back after an
        interview or expecting an offer.

7.    It's a productive way to start or end the day or to continue to move forward while
        you're waiting to hear back on an interview or a job offer.


How "working" your list can help you find a job faster
Now "
work" your list by completing a variety of tasks for each
prospective employer. 


8.    Set up search agents on major job posting sites (like Indeed.com).

9.    Set up search agents on each prospective employer's career site.

10.  Connect on LinkedIn and build a relationship with the internal or external recruiter.

11.  Connect on LinkedIn and build a relationship with at least one current employee and review
        others' profiles to learn about the background of people hired for your role.

12.  Follow the company on Facebook and Twitter to stay updated on happenings.

13.  Add the company to your "watch list" on Glassdoor to learn about employee perceptions,
        salaries and interview practices. 

14.  Set up Google alerts for each company. 

15.  Solicit information interviews using "working on your Target Company List" or "getting to
        know local employers" as a rationale for meeting.




How this works in real life
Recently I worked with a client, Sam, who was seeking a job in a particular niche in IT.  He arrived at the place in his How to Get a Job in 90 Days Plan where he was to find local employers who did the type of work in which he was an expert.  He was not excited about this task.  Sam saw these types of activities as a distraction from his main activity, which was to cruise online job postings and send in resumes.  He was a "no frills, no distractions" kind of guy.  He was also unemployed a lot longer than he expected. So he dug in. 

Sam was surprised at the number of prospective employers he had never considered.  That was the good news.  The bad news was that most of these prospective employers had abandoned the type of work that was his expertise.  [How did you know this? He used LinkedIn groups to ask questions.] It seemed that while Sam had been working on a long-term overseas assignment, IT departments had moved on to other technologies. 

Sam re-grouped quickly.  He took an online course, finishing in half the estimated completion time, crammed for and passed a very difficult test, and within a month was certified in the new technology.  Then he started working his Target Company List one by one.  He had 80 companies on his list.  He had only set up search agents at 26 of the companies when he found the ideal job for his new skills. The company agreed and he was hired shortly after getting his new certification. 


____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Please share this post with someone you know who is in a job search!

]]>
<![CDATA[HOW DO I...Create an Application Summary]]>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 18:51:57 GMThttp://getajobin90days.com/get-a-job-blog/how-do-icreate-an-application-summaryPicture
Some job searchers love them, but most consider an Application Summary a necessary evil.  All it takes is one call from a prospective employer who you don't recognize to convince you that you need better record-keeping. 

Note: Because they may be required to show their job search activity, some job searchers depend on their application summaries to support their unemployment reporting. 

What is an Application Summary?
It's a written record used to track the progress of job applications and need for followup activity.  It typically includes the job title, job description, date you applied, any materials you submitted, names and contact information, and comments. 

How can my Application Summary help me evaluate my job search progress?

An Application Summary is worth every minute you spend when a recruiter calls you "out of the blue" three months after you submitted an application! 

In reviewing your Application Summary you can identify which applications:
  • Require follow-up
  • Should be moved to the bottom of the list as "Inactive"
  • Produced the most interest from potential employers
Below is a sample Application Summary with many rows deleted to be able to show it on one page.  Note that entries are hyper-linked back to the original documents. Copy each job posting into a separate Word document and file it in a folder along with the cover letter and other documents related to that application. The job posting will disappear once the posting period is over, never to be recovered. Many of us had to learn this lesson the hard way!

It's especially important to hyper-link to the resume and other marketing materials that you used if you tend to use different resumes for different types of jobs.  You don't want to walk into the interview later with copies of a different resume!

]]>
<![CDATA[HOW DO I...Create a Board of Advisors]]>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 05:59:49 GMThttp://getajobin90days.com/get-a-job-blog/how-do-icreate-a-board-of-advisorsPicture
Out of all of the techniques I've recommended to my clients, this is the one that seems to have resulted in the most job offers. I think it's because putting together a group of people to advise you in your job search requires you to think about what you need and who can help. Since most successful job candidates land their new job with the help of someone they know already or meet along the way, it makes sense. An additional reason might be that, having someone to ask, job searchers ask questions they might not ask otherwise

What is the saying, "It takes a village..."
?  Oh, yeah.

What is a Board of Advisors?
It's a group of people that you invite to advise you throughout your job search. They can be local or virtual or a mixture. You can meet with your advisors as a group or separately, on a weekly conference call, a daily coffee shop breakfast, or a monthly dinner at your home. The dynamics and structure are up to you and your advisors.


How can a Board of Advisors help me?
  • Your Board of Advisors can:
    • Recommend target companies for your Target Company List
    • Introduce you to people on your Desired Contacts List
    • Dialogue with you to identify strengths and skills
    • Review your marketing materials
    • Advise you on all aspects of your job search
    • Provide moral support when you need it
    • Practice interview and debrief your actual interviews with you
    • Review your resume and other marketing materials.  
    • Help you "talk through" a challenge or sticky issue

      These people will be more engaged in your job search.  They will have a stake in your success because of their role in the process.
      Here's a "fill in the blank" diagram that can help you select your advisors:



]]>
<![CDATA[HOW DO I...Create the Rest of My Marketing Materials?]]>Wed, 04 Nov 2015 05:10:37 GMThttp://getajobin90days.com/get-a-job-blog/how-do-icreate-the-rest-of-my-marketing-materialsPicture
You've got the whole resume thing behind you, yeah you! The rest of your marketing materials will be easier because of all of the work you've already done.

You will need a generic cover letter that is ready to adapt as needed for each job application.

Depending on your
profession, role, or industry you may need an addendum to your resume and/or a bio. Let's take them one at a time.

COVER LETTER

How can I create a
powerful cover letter that's easily adapted?
Here's a
format I recommend.
Here's how to address your cover letter.
Follow these basic tips on writing your cover letter.


ADDENDUM

What's an addendum and how do I know if I need one?

You may or may not need an addendum. An addendum is a page or two that expands on your resume. You can submit it with your resume or at another time or occasion.
An addendum does not have the same format as a resume. It's a list of extra items a prospective employer needs to know but, if included, would make your resume too lengthy.

Format your addendum to the subject matter.  As with your resume, balance comprehensiveness with brevity. Maximize clarity and white space.

View an example of an addendum.

You would not typically send an addendum with your resume when applying for a job. It won't get the attention it deserves. I've found that you can create the most impact from an addendum is by either sending with your portfolio to an internal recruiter for distribution to interviewers or referring to it in your interviews. If, for some reason, your addendum is not seen by interviewers, it makes a great attachment to your post-interview thank you notes.

You should consider creating an addendum when: 
  • You have extensive experience in a certain skill or type of work.
  • Even though you are new to a role, you have skills and/or experience relevant to the new role.
  • You have diversity in your work experience.
  • You work in a profession where a list of your work product is expected.

Here are some examples:
Role: Writer

List of published works

Role: Psychologist
List of courses attended

Role: Artist/Photographer
List of showings or works

Role: Project Manager
Brief listing of projects led (budget, goal, result)


Role: Training Facilitator or Instructional Designer
List of topics taught or curriculum developed

Role: IT
List of systems and applications with level of mastery


BIO

Do I need a biography?  What does a bio look like?
You'll need a very brief bio for profiles on sites such as LinkedIn, Levo and about.me. You'll also need one if you publish works or for speaking engagements.

Before you write your bio, think about who you are, about factoids that might help your audience relate to you, and the tone you want to adapt. While it's important to state your credentials, give the reader a peek into what drives you.

A social media bio should reflect your personality and may look like this one:
     Hi! I'm a former CPA, author, and employee performance consultant who has left
     corporate America to focus on helping someone you love find a job fast. I've never met
     an infographic, haiku, or mindmap I didn't love. If I'm not with the kids or grandkids
     or working online, you can usually find me walking on the beach.


Many professionals and senior executives use a bio as a occasional substitute for a resume. It should be part of any professional portfolio. Tip: Ask someone else to write the first draft as it may be difficult to write glowingly about yourself in the third person. Here's an example of a professional bio:

Jane Arthur

Jane Arthur, senior employee performance consultant with RTRN, a financial services firm, has helped numerous businesses and teams around the world develop their employees and implement and achieve their business objectives. 

She has designed curriculum and led learning projects in every training medium including: classroom, webinars, link-accessed narrated slide shows, web-based interactive training, and one-minute clickable tips.

Her ideas for capturing virtual audiences, tracking training effectiveness, and developing business processes to achieve learning outcomes have been published in online learning publications and have led to measurable results for internal and external corporate clients. 

She is the former Training Manager of North American Operations for ASMCO, a global outplacement firm. Her business acumen is a result of fifteen years of experience as the CPA/owner of both public accounting and business consulting firms and her success in developing an award-winning team as Managing Consultant of the ASMCO Burlington office – the most profitable in company history at that time. 

She is the mother of four and a longtime business leader who is widely published, the author of two books, and a sought-after speaker on every aspect of communication, change management, leadership, business and financial management, and career transition. Ms. Arthur has served on numerous educational, professional, and charitable boards. She has received awards for her leadership, creativity, and performance and for her achievements on behalf of charitable and business organizations.





]]>