Got a question you'd like a recruiter to answer?  Submit it here!

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Recruiters are an integral part of the 2015 job search.  And that's a good thing.  My recruiter friends are happy to dish on how to work with them and how you can put your best foot forward.  Each week I ask them a question that will help you enrich your recruiter relationships.

This week I asked:
A great candidate made it to the “final two”, but didn’t get the offer. What could that candidate do that would encourage you to keep her/him in mind for future openings?

Here’s what recruiters suggest you do to remain in their own AND in employers' "candidate pipelines":

Thank interviewers and the recruiter
  • Send a thank-you note to everyone who participated in the interviews.
           -  Include a link to an article of mutual interest.
           -  Note that you will be following the company on social media.
           -  Offer best wishes to the team/company and their future endeavors.
           -  To the hiring manager/lead interviewer: ask for consideration if circumstances change
              in the future regarding the position. (Happens more often than you would think!)

  • Send a thank-you note to the recruiter – whether internal or external
           -  Thank the recruiter for working with you.
           -  Accept the #2 spot graciously.
           -  Briefly explain why it was a positive experience for you.
           -  Ask the recruiter for feedback from the company on how you could have
              improved your performance.
           -  Cite additional roles you could fill for the employer (and similar companies,
              if writing to an external recruiter).


_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Ideally [if you follow these guidelines], you'll be positioned to fill an open or vacated role before they even have time to update the job postings!!  D. Parillo     _________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Invite interviewers and the recruiter to connect on LinkedIn
           -  Send a LinkedIn invite to everyone who participated in the interviews.
           -  DO NOT use the default invitation verbiage. Make it personal.
           -  DO mention that you would like to keep in touch.
           -  Then, send a LinkedIn invitation to connect with the recruiter.

Remain engaged with the employer and, if applicable, the external recruiter’s firm
           -  Follow the employer (and the external recruiter’s firm) on social media.
           -  Congratulate the company on new product launches, awards, and achievements.
           -  Visit the employer’s or external recruiter’s firm booth at industry conferences,
              career fairs, or networking events.
           -  Attend future social media presentations or events in which the employer or external
              recruiting firm participates.
           -  If you've not already done so, set up a search agent to receive alerts for future job
              openings from the employer.



Extra special thanks to:
Barbara Marks, internal recruiter with eVestment
Daniel Parillo, internal recruiter manager with Razer and co-founder of RecruiterJob.net
Hermann Kepfer, internal recruiter with RAND corporation


Recruiters:  Any additional thoughts?
Job searchers:  How will you change your post-interview actions giving this advice from recruiters?



Please share with someone who is looking to find a great job.  Thanks!
 
 

    Got a question you'd like a recruiter to answer?  Submit it here!

Picture
Recruiters are an integral part of the 2015 job search.  And that's a good thing.  My recruiter friends are happy to dish on how to work with them and how you can put your best foot forward.  Each week I ask them a question that will help you enrich your recruiter relationships.

This week I asked:
What should job searchers keep in mind when devising their strategy for working with recruiters?

Here are the responses I received:

External Recruiters
  • External recruiters work for employers, not for job searchers.  It doesn't mean they don't care.  And, because their fee may be dependent on your getting the job, they have a stake in your success.  But, in the end, they are seeking the best match for the employer.

  • Although you may have your initial formal interview with a recruiter, any time you are talking with a recruiter, you should be in "interview" mode.  This is true for both internal and external recruiters.

  • If they identify you as a good candidate, they will keep you in mind, especially if they specialize in a very narrow area with limited candidates at each level.

  • They are very focused on the job openings they are trying to fill at any given time.  Keep communications brief and specific to an opening. 

  • They use social media a lot.  Make sure you have an online presence (especially LinkedIn but others as well) and that your profiles are comprehensive and up to date. 

  • The old "add me to your database" strategy doesn't work as well today because people change jobs more frequently now.  Recruiters are more likely to run a search on any given day to locate candidates than to refer back to a prior list.

  • Some recruiters will connect with you on LinkedIn especially if you are searching in their niche and if you provide info on your key skills and experience rather than the default invite. 

  • When you are working with an external recruiter, you can learn a lot about the prospective employer and what the employer is seeking. 

  • They may help you gather feedback from your interviewers on your performance and the reason you weren't selected.

  • Connect them with GOOD candidates for their openings whenever possible.

  • The best way to establish relationships with external recruiters is to contact them regarding a particular job opening of theirs, impress the heck out of a potential employer, and, even if you don't get the offer, stay in touch. 

Internal Recruiters

  • These recruiters, of course, work for a specific company or group of companies.  They are active in searching for candidates, coordinating hiring efforts with external recruiters, and in accepting applications from candidates

  • Regardless of how you make your initial contact with an internal recruiter, be sure that you request guidance and "follow the rules" on getting your application into their Human Resources system.

  • They may help you get feedback from your interviewers on your performance and the reason you weren't selected.

  • More often than you would think, they will keep you in mind if you impress them with your credentials, but don't make the final cut for an offer.  This is especially valuable when the company decides to add another posting for a position they recently filled or the initial candidate doesn't work out. 

  • Some recruiters will connect with you on LinkedIn if you are a credible candidate in their industry or role and if you give them a reason rather than using the default invite.
 
  • Follow their positions and refer GOOD candidates to them whenever possible. 

  • The best way to establish relationships with internal recruiters is to be referred by a company employee, impress the heck out of the company employees who interview you, and, even if you don't get the offer, stay in touch.


Recruiters:  What should candidates keep in mind about working with recruiters?
Job searchers:  What have you learned working with recruiters during your job search?

Please share this post with someone who is looking to find their ideal job!
 
 
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Maybe you won't shave two weeks off your job search by composing and re-using a basic job search email, but you will save some time and a ton of "psychic energy".

Note that I'm not suggesting that every email you send is the same. I am recommending, however, that you create and adapt a sample email to reflect your personality (maybe you're an exclamation-point-type person, maybe you're not), and save it for re-use and further customization to fit the occasion.

There are only so many ways to say something and you might as well figure out how you want to say it once and be done with it.

By the way, the fact that a sample situation is included in the list does not mean that I feel this type of conversation should always occur by email. Phone or face-to-face contacts, when practical, are usually preferable to email. The exception? When it's important to have a record of the conversation and texting is too informal.

Selecting the appropriate communication channel is all about the situation, the people involved, and, just as often, gut instinct.

Final note before you review the basic email: Clearly identify the purpose of the email so that your email can include a clear call to action. Use a brief version of that call to action as your subject line.

What is it that you want recipients to do? If you don't know, they won't know.

Let's assume that email is your ideal venue and that you have identified what you want to achieve. Here's a template that should meet your needs for any situation.

BEGINNING

Likely recipients:
Friends and family
New contact with whom you are building a relationship
Former colleagues who have moved to a new company
LinkedIn connections or group members


Subject:  Ex. Request for introduction to [Name and title] at [Company]

Hi [contact name],

I hope you are [enjoying your new job / keeping busy / relaxing this summer / anything that indicates you know them and care].

As you know, I'm actively searching for a new job as a [desired role / abbreviated version of your Ideal Work Situation Statement].

BODY

If your purpose is to ask someone to introduce you to an employee with a prospective employer's company:
I've discovered an ideal match for my skills and experience: [position name with link to job posting] at [company name]. If the person knows you well enough, you could add here: I hope you'll agree.

My goal is to locate an employee in the company to [transmit my resume and cover letter directly to [the recruiter / Human Resources / the hiring manager / learn more about the company culture / fill me in on how their IT department works / tell me more about the hiring manager]. You’re connected to [target name title, and company] on LinkedIn OR You've mentioned [target name] as a [friend / colleague / fellow basketball team member] previously.

If you feel comfortable doing so, would you introduce us and request contact information, noting that I'll be in touch shortly?
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
If your purpose is to gain information regarding a prospective employer on your Target Company List:
I'm putting together a list of prospective employers in my area and would like to include any companies you think might be a good fit for my role and credentials. Do you have any suggestions?
OR
I see where you are an employee with [company]. I'm in a job search and have added (company) to my Target Company List. Would you have a few minutes to talk with me about your experience as an employee? If so, please provide a time that would be convenient for us to meet by phone.
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
If your purpose is to add a person to your Board of Advisors:
I'm organizing a virtual Board of Advisors to provide specific job search advice or suggestions on my approach. I would anticipate this help would take no more than 10-15 minutes weekly, if that. Your [overall business acumen / familiarity with my role / industry/ expertise in career strategies] would be helpful to me and I would value your contribution. May I add you to my group?

ENDING
I’ve attached my [resume / bio / addendum] to update you on my credentials.

Thanks in advance for your support of my job search. As always, I truly appreciate your help!

If applicable, add a personalized thank you:
By the way, if Tuesday evenings are still good for you, let's meet at Harry's around 5:30 for a "thank you" drink.
OR
I'd like to [write a recommendation for you / endorse you] on LinkedIn. Is there a particular skill or experience you would like for me to emphasize?
OR
I've attached an article I spotted recently on [the best fishing holes in your area / your industry or role] and thought of you. Let me know if you have any luck!

[Your name]
LinkedIn email address

Attachments: resume

(Adapted from an article by Alex Cavoulacos: https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-ask-for-a-referral-an-email-template)

There are, of course, other types of emails you'll be sending as your job search progresses. We'll cover these in future blog posts.

What I hoped you got from this post:
Avoid dithering over an email with a basic template that you can adapt for each communication situation.


Take action:
1. Write your basic email with all of the possible iterations and save it to drafts in your email account.
2.  Adapt as needed.

3.  As you adapt, save a copy of each version in your drafts to save even more time
.

Please share this post with someone who is looking to find their ideal job!